The Importance of Keystone Plant Species

Goldenrod Hooded Owlet moth eating, guess what, seaside goldenrod!

Workshop

Instructor: Meredith Gallogly, Manager of Programs, Grow Native Massachusetts

  • October 29 | 5:30 - 7:30pm

CEUs: APLD (credits pending)

Fee: Member $32/ Non-member $42/ Workshop Sponsor $100

When it comes to their ability to host the larvae of moths and butterflies, not all native plants are created equal. According to research led by Douglas Tallamy, just 5% of our native plant genera host roughly 75% of our caterpillar species— insects that play a critical role in sustaining ecosystems, particularly bird populations. These super host plants are keystone species, which have an out-size impact on the health and biodiversity of their ecosystems. Join Meredith to learn about the top keystone trees, shrubs, and perennials of the northeast. She will highlight the best species for a variety of landscape conditions and scales, with tips on establishing and managing these plants, to help you maximize the ecological value of the places you steward.

Meredith Gallogly is the Manager of Programs at Grow Native Massachusetts. She is a skilled botanist, with an in-depth understanding of native plants and their habitats, as well as their importance to biodiversity. She holds a B.A. in Biology from Smith College.